Stephen Bradberry's blog

Originally published on IPS.  Written by Lily Hough. 

WASHINGTON, Jul 28, 2011 (IPS) - When news of the disastrous BP oil well explosion reached the residents of Jean Lafitte, Louisiana last April, Mayor Tim Kerner did the only thing he could think of to stop the oil from destroying his community. He encouraged everyone in his town to join him on the water, working day and night throughout the disaster to clean-up the spill.

In the aftermath of BP oil drilling disaster, it seemed that an overwhelming (albeit needed) amount of attention was given to restoring the environment, protecting animals, and the money – always the money.  Very little attention was given to actually providing health care to people impacted by the oil disaster or the response to the disaster.

Originally posted on Days after the BP oil disaster began, on Apr. 20, 2010, BP and the U.S. administration pledged that Gulf Coast communities would be made whole. One year later that promise remains unfulfilled: across the Gulf there is a developing health crisis as a result of the oil spill.

Our state and federal governments, and BP itself, must demonstrate the will to take actions promised a year ago.

As the 111th Congress of the United States of America draws to a close there is a unique opportunity for assisting the ongoing struggle for full recovery of the Gulf Coast.  The region, battered by the 2005 hurricane season, which was led by Hurricane Katrina, the largest and most expensive disaster in the history of country and followed by several smal

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