November 2010

In the pictures below, I was out shooting around the oil spill one day. There were cleanup workers everywhere. Yellow buoy floating all around the pier. I happen to catch this crane just standing on the pier, next to some guys fishing off the pier. The unusual thing was. It didn't budge at all. I got very close to it. It never moved. It just moved to the side to let me walk right by. So, I took a few snap shots of it.

North Gulfport, Mississippi - Yesterday Governor Haley Barbour, HUD Secretary Shaun Donovan, and Mississippi housing advocates represented by Reilly Morse, announced a major agreement that makes $133 million available to assist low-income Mississippians in repairing their Hurricane Katrina-damaged homes.

crowdNorth Gulfport, Mississippi - Yesterday Governor Haley Barbour, HUD Secretary Shaun Donovan, and Mississippi housing advocates represented by Reilly Morse, announced a major agreement that makes $133 million available to assist low-income Mississippians in repairing their Hurricane Katrina-damaged homes. 

Update: On Nov. 24, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration closed 4200 square miles of federal Gulf waters to fishing for royal red shrimp after oily tar balls were discovered in the nets of a commercial fisherman trawling for shrimp.

On Thursday, families of the Gulf coast will gather together to celebrate the holiday. But for many, it will be a bittersweet occasion. This is the first Thanksgiving since the BP oil disaster destroyed their coast and many of their businesses. Some will find it difficult to afford a turkey or ham to celebrate.

dear_bpIf last Saturday’s Rally for the Truth on Grand Isle, Louisiana is any indication, a lot of gulf coast residents are angry, sick, and tired.

But they are also getting energized and organized to fight for their homeland, after seven months of a woefully inadequate response to the BP oil and dispersant crisis from the “powers that be.”


I first met JJ Creppel last summer while standing in the checkout line of the Buras Dollar Store. It’s one of the few places in this Louisiana fishing town deep down in the bayou where you can buy basic groceries and milk. Nearly all the other stores were destroyed five years ago in the monster storm that roared through here and leveled this community of 5,000 people.

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