April 2011

Last night in Washington D.C., a BP clean-up worker and the son of a Vietnamese fishing family spoke to thousands of fired-up youth leaders.  Tony Nguyen and Andre Gaines were representing a diverse contingent of over one hundred people who traveled to Power Shift 2011 from across the Gulf Coast.

Searching for a way to mark the one-year anniversary of the BP oil disaster, I thought about a series of photographs I saw recently from Lower Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana. They weren’t images of coastal destruction, they were the faces of people young and old holding up a simple handwritten message answering this question: “Why Should We Save Coastal Louisiana?”

New Orleans, LA - More than 100 youth and community members from the Gulf Coast are on their way to  Washington D.C. today to bring a unified messaged to Congress and the President:  the BP oil disaster is not over.

The occasion is Power Shift 2011, a youth climate summit expected to attract 10,000, for four days of workshops, training, and action in front of the White House and on Capitol Hill.

Linda Hooper-BuiBy Linda Hooper-Bui,  225 - Nearly a year ago, we were driving home from a Florida vacation when my husband and I explained the Macondo well gushing in the Gulf to our three-year-old.

Native son Hilton Kelley will get Green Nobel for grass-roots environmentalism. By Matthew Tresaugue, Houston Chronicle.

PORT ARTHUR, Texas — The public housing project where Hilton Kelley was born and raised sits in the shadows of two refineries that belch toxic chemicals into the air.