charles taylorSo, I've learned a lot since BP came here and ruined things on the Gulf Coast. I've had a front row seat to the whole crazy mess here in Mississippi. I've opened my eyes to the realization that all these companies could give a rat's snout about us. We are expendable. We are the cost of doing business. We are nothing to them. BP, Exxon, Enbridge, etc., etc. They are all just alike in their lies and denials and coverups.

stephen teagueStephen Teague is a staff attorney at the Mississippi Center for Justice, where his main work is providing free legal assistance to people who have claims with the Gulf Coast Claims Facility (GCCF), the mechanism that was set up to compensate those who suffered economic losses as a result of the BP oil disaster.  He recently spoke about the GCCF with Bridge The Gulf and the Institute for Southern Studie

rev thompsonBishop Anthony Thompson is executive director of the Kingdom Community Development Corporation, and a member of the Coalition of African American Communities (COAAC).  He recently spoke with Bridge The Gulf and the Institute for Southern Studies for the report Troubled Waters: Two Years After the BP

roberta avilaRoberta Avila is the executive director of the STEPS Coalition, which includes 30 social justice organizations on the Mississippi Gulf Coast that came together after Hurricane Katrina.  Avila spoke with Bridge The Gulf and the Institute for Southern Studies for the report

Dead dolphin on Mississippi Beach in 2011                   Photo: Laurel Lockamy

Since BP’s catastrophic oil blowout nearly two years ago, Laurel Lockamy has gotten pretty good at photographing the dead. She’s snapped images of dozens of lifeless turtles and dolphins, countless dead fish, birds, armadillos and nutria and pretty much anything that crawls, swims or flies near the white sandy Mississippi beaches of her Gulfport home.


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