Voices from the Gulf

Showing stories 781 through 790 of 792 total stories.

Like most Gulf state Department heads, Dr. William Walker of the Mississippi Dept of Marine Resources is a virtual "one man gang." Until and unless the eminent Haley Barbour himself calls up to weigh in, Walker answers to no one.

When asked at a recent public forum by US Navy Secretary Ray Mabus to tell the audience which exact body or group of people in Mississippi had considered public health and safety in ruling to re-open State waters and beaches impacted by the now-capped BP Oil gusher - Doctor Walker bellowed from the back of the packed room, "I did!"

Despite the media frenzy that Hurricane Katrina brought to the Gulf Coast, many communities in the region felt that they were either misunderstood or overlooked. That invisibility translated into a failed recovery in many communities where citizens are still without basic needs, including permanent, affordable housing. We are determined that the communities most effected by the BP disaster will be heard and that we will not repeat the mistakes of the past. Bridge the Gulf is an important tool that we intend to use wisely and creatively in this movement for self-determination.

This Op-Ed was published in the Biloxi-Gulfport Sun Herald on July 30, 2010.

It is only fair that Gulf Coast residents should get the same chance to shape the future of oil and gas development in our region that Alaskans did following the Exxon Valdez spill. Unfortunately, citizens’ councils that have proved effective in guiding responsible development in Alaska are not part of a Gulf of Mexico drilling bill now before Congress. They should be.

Bayou People (BP) Voices is a collection of video profiles of leaders from coastal communities that have been directly impacted by the BP oil disaster.  These community leaders have been working for years to bring justice and sustainability to their families, their neighbors, and the ecosystems of the Gulf Coast.  These videos were created by Bridge the Gulf in partnership with the Gulf Coast Fund for Community Renewal and Ecological Health.

Being intentional about "healing" the open wounds and the powerlessness of those victimized by "man-made" disasters is just as important as environmental recovery. The recovery of the environment is intertwined with the recovery of our humanity. Every time a "man made" disaster occurs the emotional, mental, and spiritual strengths erodes. Due to the multigenerational nature of these "unnatural" disasters, internalized messages of lack and limits reinforces a culture of oppression.

Pages