When I started Coastal Women for Change, it wasn't my vision to run a nonprofit. If it had been, I would have done my research and learned how to manage one. I was thrown into this work after a devastation. I was a cosmetologist before Hurricane Katrina. I started speaking up for my community and reaching out to my neighbors when I saw how my community of East Biloxi was being left out of the recovery process.

vigilBy Dr. Lance Hill, crossposted from Justice Roars. One of the post-Katrina policies touted as a way of reducing poverty and crime was to demolish most of the large housing projects and disperse the poor throughout the city (and the nation).

By Lance Hill.  Crossposted from Justice Roars. On September 22 the Census Bureau released information from their 2010 annual American Community Survey based on a poll of 2,500 people in New Orleans.

roberta avilaBy Roberta Avila
Originally published in the Sun Herald, August 24th, 2010

In the immediate aftermath of Hurricane Katrina I became the director for the Mississippi Coast Interfaith Disaster Task Force and was thrown headlong into disaster recovery work.

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