Social and Economic Justice

Two days after a tornado tore through Eupora, Mississippi, Cherraye Oats set out with her daughter Courtney to get tarps for their neighbors’ battered homes.  Oats’ house was spared, but the mobile home 20-year-old Courtney rented was destroyed.  “If my daughter had not spent the night with us, we probably would have been burying her.”

We who believe in freedom CANNOT REST!! The loss of Troy Davis is a living testimony that we must continue the conversation about the Justice System; From the ways people enter, the inhuman conditions that PEOPLE go through while they are in jail, and the way people exit and re-enter society. Let's mourn but do not give up. Know that the battle may be lost but the war has just begun.

Let us Pray: Oh Divine Creator of the Heavens and the Earths, hear our pray that NO ONE ELSE is killed by this horrendous Death Penalty.  St. Francis - Pray for us.

The Norwood Thompson playground is a gathering place for all ages in Gert Town.  It is a place of fellowship for residents of this New Orleans neighborhood, and provides a break for working mothers to spend time with their children.

But it is also destined and designed as an accident waiting to happen. As you will hear and see from the children and adults who use it, the playground is an environmental health hazard.

By Bill Quigley.  Cross-posted from Huffington Post.

Six years ago, Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf coast. The impact of Katrina and government bungling continue to inflict major pain on the people left behind. It is impossible to understand what happened and what still remains without considering race, gender and poverty. The following offer some hints of what remains.

Right after Hurricane Katrina, newly homeless New Orleanians gathered on Claiborne Avenue under Interstate 10, and lived under tents and blankets. Some worked in hotels in the French Quarter and the Central Business District, but still didn’t make enough to pay for a place to live.  For a time, their numbers went down.  But now, six years after the storm, homeless folks are under the Claiborne Bridge, and under the Earhart Bridge, in large numbers again.


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